Tavern Trove: The American Soldier and Sobriety

Welcome to Tavern Trove
919.251.8961
Join our mailing list to learn about upcoming sales
 Include Descriptions
Upcoming Events
<< April 2018 >>
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
     
0 Events This Month

Add Event       View Larger
We Accept We Accept Discover, Visa & MasterCard
Login
User-name or Email:
 
Password:
 
Remember me 


The American Soldier and Sobriety


Item #:62050
Category:Paper Ads
Maker: United Brewers Industrial Foundation
New York, NY, USA
Grade:Grade 9
Date:1943
Price:$4.99
  [Purchase Item] Purchase this item
  [Add Item to Wish List] Add this item to your wish list
  [View All Seller's Items] View all of this seller's items
  [Ask Question] Ask a question about this item
  [Sell Item] Sell us your The American Soldier and Sobriety paper ads
[Thumbnail-1]
Description:
10½ x 14 inches tall.
Facts quoted direct from the official statement by the United States Government's Office of War Information:
1. "There is not ecsessive drinking among troops, and drinking does not constitute a serious problem."
2. "The sale of 3.2 beer in the post exchanges in training camps is a positive factor in Army sobriety."
3. "No American army in all history bus been so orderly."
"This American Army may or may not be the best in the history of armies, but it is certainly the best behaved."
"The approach of the military authorities to the problem is not prohibition, but control."
"The problem of control in general requires different methods in different localities . . . Strict law enforcement by civilian authorities and full co-operation with Army authorities usually means an orderly relationship."
"In dry states and in states where there is local option, the military faces the problem of bootleg liquor. Bootleggers cannot be regu¬lated; legal dispensers can be regulated."
"Enlightened self-interest is one of the most effective regulators. Tavern associations in many cities have set up their own rules of conduct . . . to make sure their members `stay in line.'"
".. . various state branches of the Brewing industry- Foundation—the beer manufac¬turers' enlightened trade organization—have taken the initiative. Through control of dis¬tributors the Foundation has been able to clean up unsavory places. The Foundation's . system works."
"The sale of 3.2 beer in Army camps is a healthy and sensible arrangement. The fact that there is vastly less drinking among soldiers in this war than in the last war ... may stem in part from this sale of beer in camps.
"In the last war camps were bone-dry. As a result, bootleggers did a thriving business. "Conditions in a certain dry Texas town offer a current example of the unhappy results of complete prohibition. On one side of town is a military reservation where beer is sold on post.
"On the other side of town is a reservation where the commanding officer has dried up the post entirely. His is the post which has a policing problem and a lower morale."
"The case for 3.2 beer is presented thus by chaplains and military police alike: it pro¬vides soldiers with a mild relaxation without impairing their efficiency ...
"There is no indication that sale of beer lowers the number of total abstainers. Statistics present a pretty accurate picture of conditions as they exist in all camps...more soft drinks than beer are sold 'Pt canteens ... by 33 per cent."
"The American soldier needs neither curtain lecture nor apology. He behaves well, he trains well, and in the far-flung places of the earth he is fighting well. He is intelligent, he is able, he is a hard worker. He is serious of purpose because he fully understands the grav¬ity of war. His commanding officers believe in him and his chaplains are proud of him."
The report of the Office of War Information, was an independent objective study curried out without the knowledge of the brewing industry, and publication of excerpts here in no way implies endorsement of the product.
Published by Brewing Industry Foundation, 21 Fast 40th Street, New York City